We're hiring for our 2019 Environmental Education Assistant (AmeriCorps)!

FRIENDS of Great Salt Lake is seeking a part-time Environmental Education Assistant to complete 450 hours of work (an average of 20 hours/week) during a 6-7 month time period (April through October, 2019). The Environmental Education Assistant will play a key facilitation role within our 4th grade Lakeside Learning field trip program at Great Salt Lake and will support education and outreach projects as well as the organization's special events.

Lakeside Learning field trips take place Monday through Friday, between 8am and 2pm during the months of April, May, September, October at Antelope Island State Park and the Great Salt Lake Marina. The ideal candidate will be available during these hours with some flexibility.

Additional work will generally take place during business hours, Monday through Friday, although some evening and weekends may be required. Although this position will average 20 hours per week, the weekly time commitment will be variable, with some weeks requiring up to 40 hours. FRIENDS of Great Salt Lake’s central office is located in Salt Lake City.

The Environmental Education Assistant will:

  • Assist in the coordination of our Lakeside Learning field trip program, including:
  • Lead groups of 4th graders through a series of outdoor educational activities at Antelope Island State Park and Great Salt Lake Marina
  • Coordinate field trip schedules with volunteers and teachers
  • Prepare and maintain field trip gear
  • Work with staff, volunteers, and program participants to evaluate Lakeside Learning and suggest ideas for improvement
  • Collaborate to develop new summer educational programming, such as seminars, field trips, and day-camp experiences for K-6 students. This may include research of feasibility and costs.
  • Co-lead Great Salt Lake Summer Camp (a week-long day camp for 4th and 5th graders)*Candidate must be available the weeks of June 10-14 and June 24-28, from 8:30am-5:00pm.
  • Participate in public outreach events and festivals
  • Assist with the coordination and staffing of the annual fall fundraising event (Event held on 10/10/19)
  • Assist with other FRIENDS of Great Salt Lake education/outreach efforts as needed, which may include:
  • Design and create outreach items and educational materials
  • Update existing curriculum
  • Plan/staff special events
  • Other duties as assigned

Minimum Qualifications:

  • Adaptability
  • Bachelor’s degree (or working towards a degree) in Environmental Science, Biology, Education, Communications, or related subject
  • Experience working with children preferably in an outdoor and/or educational setting
  • Enjoy working outdoors in a variety of weather conditions
  • Effective at communicating with a variety of audiences
  • Experience designing curriculum and educational activities
  • Basic knowledge of ecology and geology and a willingness and ability to quickly learn new concepts
  • Able to walk short distances (1 mile) over uneven terrain and lift moderate loads (25 pounds)
  • Valid driver’s license, car insurance, and access to an automobile for personal transportation
  • Must have access to computer and internet
  • Social media platform experience
  • Proficiency with MS Office Suite

Desired Qualifications:

  • Knowledgeable of the Great Salt Lake Ecosystem and local conservation, education, and management groups

Salary :

AmeriCorps members receive the following benefits for this 450-hour position: $3,317 living stipend paid in even disbursements throughout the term of service, about $450 per month. Approximately $1,556.14 Education Award (given upon completion of service – this award can be used for future schooling or federal student loans).

How to Apply: Email a resume and cover letter to Katie Newburn at pelican@fogsl.org no later than March 12, 2019.

Please note: Any offer of employment will be conditional, pending the candidate’s successful enrollment in Americorps/Utah Conservation Corps (UCC) and successful completion of a criminal background check. For more information about the UCC, visit www.usu.edu/ucc/

By Lee Davidson, Salt Lake Tribune

 

In November, a Delta Air Lines Boeing 767 carrying 223 passengers lifted off from Salt Lake City International Airport heading for Paris. But officials say six big tundra swans flew into it over the runway, crashing into its nose and engine covers.

No birds survived, and the airport’s chief says it was “a very, very close call” for the jumbo jet.

The birds “didn’t go straight into the engine, which is fortunate. Because at that elevation and that location, the potential for recovery is not great,” Bill Wyatt, executive director of the airport, told the Airport Advisory Board recently. The plane safely landed a few minutes later, and was grounded for inspection and repair.

The Federal Aviation Administration reported nearly 14,500 bird strikes nationally in 2017. Those numbers led the agency to propose drastically increasing the area where all major airports must work to keep wildlife away from planes, expanding it from two miles to five beyond airport boundaries.

Leah Hogsten | The Salt Lake Tribune A Burrowing Owl rests on the fence surrounding the Salt Lake International Airport. The airport had 280 bird strikes in 2018. Most were minor, but overall they caused at least $674,892 in reported damage. There were 171 bird strikes with small song birds; 39 with waterfowl, 36 with raptors, 13 with bats and four with pigeons or doves. Another 17 strikes were with unknown types of birds.

Leah Hogsten | The Salt Lake Tribune A Burrowing Owl rests on the fence surrounding the Salt Lake International Airport. The airport had 280 bird strikes in 2018. Most were minor, but overall they caused at least $674,892 in reported damage. There were 171 bird strikes with small song birds; 39 with waterfowl, 36 with raptors, 13 with bats and four with pigeons or doves. Another 17 strikes were with unknown types of birds.

 

The FAA may yank federal funding from airports and their sponsors — such as Salt Lake City — that do not do everything in their power to limit new developments that could attract birds and other wildlife, including denying building permits.

That proposed five-mile boundary includes much of Salt Lake City (to 1300 East on the east, plus all of its northwest quadrant out to the Kennecott tailings ponds).

Click here to continue reading.

Tuesday, 19 February 2019 08:21

Inland Port Public Engagement Meetings

Envision Utah has been contracted to carry out "public engagement" for the Utah Inland Port.  The initial public open houses listed below are the first two scheduled.  

Tuesday, February 19th | 6-8 p.m.
State Fairgrounds – Zions Building
155 N 1000 W
Salt Lake City, UT 84116


Thursday, February 28th | 6-8 p.m.
Franklin Elementary School
1115 W 300 S
Salt Lake City, UT 84104

Please note that Envision Utah is being paid $100,000 for this work labelled "public engagement", but which is likely to be a PR initiative designed to sell the public on the Port. 

There is also a survey that one can take. Go to https://www.utahinlandport.org/public-meetings.
Be aware that this survey is part of Envision Utah's efforts to sway the public.  As Terry Marasco of Moms for Clean Air says:
1. It presents it as a done deal. You may want to comment that that is a questionable assumption
2. It mentions nothing of the rushed and non-transparent way it (the Inland Port) was rushed thru the 2018 legislature (last 45 minutes for the legislature to read the bill!), and what do you think about that..
3. It mentions nothing about the fact that the state took away a huge chunk of salt lake city/county and put it in state hands
4. It says nothing about the fact that perhaps $500M of school tax revenues will be removed from the SL school district

Hope to see you there. 

A scientific paper, ""Using remote cameras to validate estimates of nest fate in shorebirds," by FRIEND, John Cavit, along with his student Kristen Ellis, and two other colleagues is one of three finalists for the best paper published in Ibis during 2018. 

Click here to read the paper.

Click here to vote.

FRIENDS of Great Salt Lake is seeking to hire an Environmental Education Coordinator. 

Title: Environmental Education Coordinator

Location: Salt Lake City, UT

Status: Part-time, Year round

Compensation: $10-$12 hourly

FRIENDS of Great Salt Lake (FRIENDS) was founded in 1994. The mission of FRIENDS is to preserve and protect Great Salt Lake ecosystems and to increase public awareness and appreciation of the Lake through education, research, advocacy, and the arts. The long-term vision of FRIENDS is to achieve comprehensive watershed-based restoration and protection for the Great Salt Lake Ecosystem.

The Environmental Education Coordinator’s primary responsibility will be facilitating the 4th grade Lakeside Learning field trip program at Antelope Island State Park and Great Salt Lake Marina State Park. This position will also participate in community outreach events, administrative duties, and other tasks as assigned by the Education and Outreach Director. 

The Environmental Education Coordinator works with a diverse population of students, in groups of 25-50, in remote outdoor settings; it is essential that the Environmental Education Coordinator be comfortable working in various conditions (biting insects, salt, sand, rain, sun) outdoors and be adaptable in the case of inclement weather.

Lakeside Learning field trips take place Monday through Friday, between 8am and 2pm during the months of April, May, June, September, and October at Antelope Island State Park and Great Salt Lake Marina State Park. Additional work will generally take place during business hours, Monday through Friday, although some evening and weekends may be required. Although this position will average 20-25 hours per week, the weekly time commitment will be variable.

The Environmental Education Coordinator will:

  • Assist in the coordination of our Lakeside Learning field trip program, including:
    • Lead groups of 4th graders through a series of outdoor educational activities at Antelope Island State Park and Great Salt Lake Marina State Park.
    • Coordinate field trip schedules with volunteers and teachers
    • Prepare and maintain field trip gear
    • Work with staff, volunteers, and program participants to evaluate Lakeside Learning
  • Co-lead Great Salt Lake Summer Camp (a week-long day camp for 4th and 5th graders)
  • Coordinate participation in public outreach events and festivals
  • Assist with preparations for and during FRIENDS’ annual fall fundraising event
  • Assist with other FRIENDS of Great Salt Lake education/outreach efforts as needed, which may include:
    • Design and create outreach items and educational materials
    • Update existing curriculum
    • Plan/staff special events
    • Other duties as assigned

Minimum Qualifications:

  • Bachelor’s Degree in Education, Environmental Studies, or related discipline preferred (2+ years of job experience will be considered in place of education)
  • Capable of acting as a group facilitator
  • Comfortable working with youth in an outdoor setting
  • Ability to maintain a positive attitude and a calm demeanor in stressful situations
  • Strong organizational skills
  • Self-motivated and independent
  • Quick learner and willingness to learn environmental concepts, specifically those focused on Great Salt Lake
  • Ability to do moderate lifting and walk up to a mile over uneven terrain
  • Computer proficiency and access to a computer and internet
  • Experience on social media platforms
  • Valid Drivers’ License and own transportation (mileage reimbursement available when using personal vehicle)
  • Successful completion of a criminal background check, upon hiring

Preferred Qualifications:

  • Prior experience teaching environmental education
  • Prior experience working with youth in an outdoor setting
  • Familiarity with inquiry-based facilitation, place-based education
  • Knowledgeable of the Great Salt Lake Ecosystem and local conservation, education, and management groups
  • Safety training and certifications

How to Apply:
Email a resume, cover letter, and 3 references to Holly Simonsen at snowyegret@fogsl.org no later than Friday March 1, 2019.

Wednesday, 06 February 2019 16:16

SB 119 Legacy Parkway Truck Ban Extension

Join FRIENDS of Great Salt Lake and Save Legacy Parkway on Thursday, February 7 from 4:00-5:00 PM at Utah State Capitol East Senate Building Room 215 as we rally support to extend the Legacy Parkway Truck Ban. Community organizers suggest we wear yellow to visibly show our support of the bill. Click here for more informaton. 

By Brian Maffly

Will Utah have sufficient water in an era of declining stream flows to support a population expected to double, strong agriculture, recreation economies and a healthy environment?

While that sounds like having your Diet Coke and drinking it, too, water policy honchos believe Utah can meet its future water needs, though not without developing new sources and improving the way water is currently used.

The use-it-or-lose-it foundation of Western water law promotes waste or at least suboptimal use of this most precious natural resource and is fraught with disincentives for conservation.

Several bills cued up for this legislative session seek to reduce Utahns’ notoriously profligate water use and to add flexibility to the ways water rights are administered. In general, lawmakers prefer addressing the water question with “market-based voluntary transactions” as opposed to regulatory “command and control” oversight.

A 'bank’ for liquid assets

At the forefront of this discussion is a resolution championed by Sen. Jani Iwamoto, D-Holladay, to promote “water banking,” a program that enables growers to pause their water use without risk of forfeiting their right to the water. With agriculture accounting for 80 percent of use, banking could go along way to solving the state’s water woes.

The idea, which is already being tested on the Provo River and in Cache Valley, is to allow water that would otherwise be used for irrigation to remain in a waterway, where it would support in-stream flows and reach downstream reservoirs. Farmers who do that now can find themselves without water in the future because someone else might want to use that water.

Gov. Gary Herbert’s water strategy advisory team recently released recommendations that included developing a system to facilitate temporary water-right transfers through leases and contracts to supply competing users with water to meet short-term needs. Water banks could help implement such a recommendation, according to Iwamoto’s SJR1.

“This is something worth doing for the benefit of the state,” water attorney Steve Clyde told the Legislature’s Water Development Commission at its last meeting in November. “But we have to make sure these are valid water rights that are being banked, that people aren’t dealing with prior forfeited rights and paper rights and the speculators we have seen out there in the marketplace.”

Water banking is a critical piece of Utah’s strategy to ensure enough water remains in the Colorado River to meet downstream obligations and preserve Lake Mead and Lake Powell, which are now less than half full.

Click here to continue.

 

chrys golden eagle

Please join HawkWatch International for an opportunity to meet and learn about our newest Raptor Ambassador.

February 5, 2019
6 - 8 p.m.
HawkWatch International
2240 South 900 East
Salt Lake City, UT

Chrys is an adult male Golden Eagle and comes to HawkWatch International after being hit by a car, the most common injury among raptors. After spending time in a wildlife rehabilitation center, Chrys was deemed non-releasable and would spend his life under human care. He'll join our other amazing Raptor Ambassadors in an effort to teach our community about conservation and the threats birds of prey face in the wild.

We hope to see you on February 5!

Wednesday, 16 January 2019 12:41

Community Forum on the Inland Port Feb. 2

Join us for a FREE community meeting.

February 2 9 AM - 1:30 PM The Zion Building at the Utah State Fair Park (155 North 1000 West), Salt Lake City

You're invited to a free community forum that will examine the ecological and community impacts of the proposed Utah inland port. The inland port is proposed to be a large scale truck, train and plane frieght transfer facility on 16,000 acres of land within SLC (mostly), Magna and WVC. We'll discuss the risks of increased diesel truck and train traffic, the threats to air quality, the potential for water, light and noise pollution and loss of wildlife habitat. Come learn the details, hear from national experts on how to stop pollution caused by ports, and be involved in shaping the future of this project and our community!

FRIENDS of Great Salt Lake established the Doyle W. Stephens scholarship to celebrate Stephens' remarkable scientific contributions toward understanding the Great Salt Lake Ecosystem. This scholarship provides support to undergraduate or graduate students engaged in new or on-going research that focuses on Great Salt Lake and its ecosystem. For 2019, FRIENDS will award two $1,000 scholarships, one to a graduate researcher and one to an undergraduate researcher.

Eligibility: Applicants must be undergraduate or graduate students currently enrolled at an accredited college or university. Individuals who have previously received this award are not eligible. The award may be used to support laboratory or field research, attendance at professional meetings, or other activities that further the understanding or protection of the Great Salt Lake ecosystem. Research located anywhere in the Great Salt Lake watershed can qualify for this award. We will consider projects from any academic field (for instance: ecology, biology, chemistry, physics, geography, geology, urban planning, social sciences, communications, education, economics, tourism, engineering, etc.). 

The 2019 Doyle W. Stephens Scholarship Applications are now open and will close March 15, 2019. Click here to access the application.

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Why We Care

  • To travelers so long shut among the mountain ranges a sudden view over the expanse of silent waters had in it something sublime. Several large islands raised their rocky heads out of the waves. . . . Then, a storm burst down with sudden fury upon the lake, and entirely hid the islands from our view.

    John C. Fremont, Report of the Exploring Expedition to the Rocky Mountains, 1845