What's Next? Designing Legacy Parkway's Future

13 March 2019 Published in News & Events

If you are a resident, trail user, auto-commuter, birder or other concerned citizen, please join us for an evening of discussion and idea-generation focused on protecting our beloved Legacy Parkway. Whats Next Flier Pg1

Despite significant effort put forth by Rep. Ballard, Sen. Weiler, co-sponsors, supporting municipalities, and organizational allies, HB 339 and SB 119 failed to pass out of their respective legislative committees and we were unable to get an extension to the Legacy Parkway Truck Ban during this session. The following links will take you to committee meeting recordings should you like to review the discussion:

SB 119 2/7/19 - https://bit.ly/2u3IOPx

HB 339 2/22/19 - https://bit.ly/2F7cIc9
and 2/25/19 - https://bit.ly/2HgjoH4

Rep. Ballard suggested we gather for a follow-up to our January 16 Community Meeting to discuss what happened during the session, what was learned, and what options we still have going forward. Most importantly we will have small group discussion time to hear from YOU–our residents, commuters and trail users–about your real concerns about how Legacy Parkway will change on January 1, 2020 when the ban on heavy trucks expires. Let's fill the room again!

One thing that Save Legacy Parkway committee members learned is that there are many opportunities for us to be informed and involved, and if state or local government does not do due diligence to protect and prepare residents for change, we need to speak up. We need commitments from leaders with regard to what action they will take to mitigate the negative impacts on communities and sensitive environmental areas around Legacy Parkway before January 1, 2020.

Complete our Next Steps Survey: https://bit.ly/2O0Jzlz
Sign our Petition: https://bit.ly/2F8WPBV

Your voice matters, please make every effort to attend.

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Why We Care

  • We suggest that Great Salt Lake is a phenomenal asset to the state of Utah. Its mineral resources have been appreciated for almost 150 years. Brine shrimp are now appreciated because they are economically valuable. To only a very limited extent is the lake appreciated for tourism, for culture, for earth systems history and for education. 

    Scientific Review Committee, Comments to the Great Salt Lake Management Planning Team, 1999