Friend Of The Lake Award

Photo courtesy of John Luft, Great Salt Lake Ecosystem Program/Division of Wildlife Resources Photo courtesy of John Luft, Great Salt Lake Ecosystem Program/Division of Wildlife Resources

FRIENDS is proud to present the 2016 Friend of the Lake award to the Great Salt Lake Ecosystem Program.

 

At the the 2016 Great Salt Lake Issues Forum, FRIENDS honored the Great Salt Lake Ecosystem Program (GSLEP) with this award for its collaborative due diligence in studying artemia franciscana – Great Salt Lake brine shrimp.

Over the past 20 years, this public-private partnership represented by the Great Salt Lake Brine Shrimp Cooperative, Division of Wildlife Resources, U.S. Geological Survey, Utah State University and the University of Notre Dame has succeeded in developing a sustainable management model for this resource.

The Brine Shrimp Population Model developed by Dr. Gary Belovsky, University of Notre Dame, is a model used to track the brine shrimp demographics and manage the fishery in order to maximize production and ensure a healthy ecosystem.Our hats go off to the Great Salt Lake Ecosystem Program (GSLEP) for its coordinated effort in providing a valuable tool for managing this resource.

 

FRIENDS would like to recognize the following people for their contribution to this legacy.

John Luft – Division of Wildlife Resources (DWR)

Dr. Gary Belovsky – University of Notre Dame

Don Archer – formerly with the Department of Natural Resources

Don Paul – formerly with DWR

Kyle Stone – DWR

Jim VanLeeuwen- DWR

John Neill- DWR

Clay Perschon- formerly with DWR

Ashley Kijowski - DWR

John Cavitt – Weber State University

Don Leonard – GSL Brine Shrimp Cooperative

Tom Bosteels – GSL Brine Shrimp Cooperative

Bonnie Baxter – GSL Institute

Mike Conover – Utah State University

Cory Angeroth – U.S.G.S.

Rob Baskin – U.S.G.S.

Paul Birdsey – DWR

Mark Lamon – Ocean Star International

                        


Friend of the Lake Award Recipients

The Friend of the Lake Award is given to a person, organization, or business performing outstanding work in education, research, advocacy and/or the arts to benefit Great Salt Lake. There is a vibrant and active community of people working on behalf of the Lake. Their efforts help increase our understanding and awareness of our big salty neighbor. Understanding can lead to positive action for preservation of Great Salt Lake. To recognize these talents and contributions, FRIENDS of Great Salt Lake established an award to be presented at our Biennial Great Salt Lake Issues Forum.

2002 – The first award was presented to the late Dr. Donald R. Currey, geomorphologist in the Geography Department at the University of Utah. Dr. Currey worked to raise awareness about the unique geomorphological features that surround Great Salt Lake, their importance as archives of the past, and why they should be protected.

2004 - Joy Emory is an environmental engineer representing FRIENDS on the Kennecott South End Technical Advisory Committee as part of the CERCLA process. Her understanding of extremely complex surface and ground water dynamics as it pertains to the remediation of mining contamination helped FRIENDS participate more fully in this important process.

2006 - Al Trout is the retired manager of the USFWS Bear River Migratory Bird Refuge in Brigham City, Utah. Al worked tirelessly with the community and volunteers to restore the Refuge after the high water years of the 1980’s. He continues to be an arch advocate for Great Salt Lake preservation and protection.

2008 – There were two recipients this year -  a doctor and an attorney. It’s important for the Lake to have both. Dr. Maunsel Pearce, Chair of the GSL Alliance and Joro Walker, Senior Attorney at Western Resources Advocates. Dr. Pearce has always been there for the Lake – advocating for better management, stronger protection and greater recognition of this hemispherically important ecosystem.

Just like good science, good legal insight can strengthen the work FRIENDS is trying to do for the Lake. Joro has been instrumental in providing legal support to help advance timely and responsible results for the Lake.

2010 – Don Paul is president of AvianWest, Inc, a bird and habitat conservation business. He is a career wildlife biologist having served 34 years in several positions for the Utah Division of Wildlife Resources and four years as the Great Basin Bird Conservation Region Coordinator. His career emphasis takes two directions, conservation biology with emphases in international community conservation linkages and avian conservation with experience in large-scale landscape bird monitoring.

2012 – Charles Uibel, (greatsaltlakephotography.com) has an incredible photographic eye. He has been to just about every place a person can go around the Lake, capturing its beauty in such a magical way that the viewer is awed. His photographs are a constant reminder of the power and the importance of Great Salt Lake in our lives.

2014 - Hikmet Sidney Loe teaches art history at Westminster College in   Salt Lake City. Her research on Robert Smithson’s earthwork the Spiral Jetty has led to her cumulative work, The Spiral Jetty Encyclo: Exploring Robert Smithson’s Earthwork through Time and Place (forthcoming, as are several book chapters on the earthwork). She contributes regularly to the online magazine 15 Bytes (artistsofutah.org) and has essays included in the online sitemappingslc.org. Exhibition catalog essays were commissioned of Loe in 2013 for Utah Biennial: Mondo Utah (Utah Museum of Contemporary Art) and Plurality: Frank McEntire in Retrospect (Snow College University), and in 2014 for No One Site (The Leonardo and the School of Architecture, University of Utah). She has curated exhibitions at Westminster College, Finch Lane Gallery (Art Barn), and The Museum of Modern Art Library, New York; lectures frequently; and exhibits photographs related to the land.

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Why We Care

  • It is a desert of water in a desert of salt and mud and rock, one of the most desolate and desolately beautiful of regions. Its sunsets, seen across water that reflects like polished metal, are incredible. Its colors are of a staring, chemical purity. The senses are rubbed raw by its moonlike horizons, its mirages, its parching air, its moody and changeful atmosphere.

    Wallace Stegner, "Dead Heart of the West" in American Places, 1981